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Tuesday, January 03, 2006

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Reg Adkins

My understanding of Dyslexia is a neurocognitive deficit that is specifically related to the reading and spelling processes. Typically, children classified as dyslexic are reported to be bright and capable in other intellectual domains. Current research indicates that the vast majority of children with dyslexia have phonological core deficits. The severity of the phonological deficits varies across individuals, and children with these deficits have been shown to make significantly less progress in basic word reading skills compared to children with equivalent IQs. Without direct instruction in phonemic awareness and sound-symbol correspondences, these children generally fail to attain adequate reading levels.
Given the above I'd like your thoughts on the direct instruction article I posted to elemental truths on Decber 9, 2005.

Rev. Marilyn Redmond

Neurocognitive deficit means that now there is scientific evidence that this can be corrected.

There is a new use for therapeutic hypnosis and holistic counseling. Harold B. Crasilneck, Ph.D., and James A. Hall, M.D. of Dallas Texas states that relatively little use of hypnosis is used in treating dyslexia. However, they report that “three-fourths of the dyslexic children treated through hypnosis demonstrated moderate to marked improvement.”

In addition, the scientific research by
Russian biophysicist and molecular biologist Pjotr Garjajev has scientifically proven that affirmations along with meditation/ hypnosis (another term for meditation) will raise consciousness, well-being, and even change DNA.

Energy can be used to heal the nerves by raising the energy in the person. There are several supportive ways to achieve this.

Let's live in the 21st century where science shows us ways to improve our lives not explored before. A diagnosis does not have to be a life time sentence anymore. Isn't it compassionate to help people overcome maladies?

liz

Reverend Redmond, you need to provide proof that your treatment (hypnotherapy) has any positive effect on a dyslexic student's reading. Not for speed. Not for accuracy. Not for fluency. Not for comprehension.

You appeal to authority by quoting Crasilneck and Hall. You appear to be quoting from their 1985 handbook, and there is no other published evidence for the claim.

There is absolutely no evidence that DNA can be affected by either affirmations or hypnosis.

How is it ethical for you to charge money for an intervention that has no proof of efficacy?

More thorough rebuttal at Annals of Quackery: Hypnosis and Dyslexia

What kind of proof? This kind of proof:

"With about 112 hours of phonic-based instruction, adults with dyslexia had significant improvements in reading and changes in brain activity while reading," said Lynn Flowers, Ph.D., senior researcher, from Wake Forest Baptist. "We know that dyslexia is not something children outgrow, and our findings suggest that it's never too late for instruction to overcome this disability."

This was the first independent research study of whether phonics-based instruction is effective in adults with dyslexia and the first to measure whether the instruction would result in changes in brain activation. Dyslexia, or difficulty learning to read, has been associated with underactivity in areas of the brain that process language and "decode" words into groups of letters that are associated with meaningful sound patterns.

The research involved 19 adults with dyslexia and 19 typical readers without dyslexia. The mean age of participants, who were mostly from the Winston-Salem area, was 42.5.

Dyslexia is the most common learning disability and affects about 10 percent of the population. "A huge number of adults have this problem, so it's important to know whether something can be done to treat it," said Flowers, an assistant professor of neurology. "Adults with dyslexia can suffer significant financial and emotional consequences."

The researchers used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) – which shows brain activation during a task – to verify whether adults with dyslexia process language differently from typical readers. The testing – performed while participants completed a phonics task – showed that several areas of the brain, predominantly on the left side, were less active in participants with dyslexia. These areas are associated with processing phonetic sounds and recognizing familiar objects.

"This verified our findings and those of others and confirms that dyslexia is biologically based," said Flowers.

The researchers then tested to see if instruction in phonics would improve reading ability and produce changes in brain activation. Half of the participants with dyslexia received phonics-based instruction 15 hours a week for eight weeks. Before the instruction began, they completed pen-and-paper tests to measure their reading ability and underwent fMRI. After the instruction, they completed a second round of written and fMRI testing.

The written tests showed that participants who received instruction made gains of between six and 23 percent in text reading, phonetic awareness and the ability to "decode" the written word. fMRI testing revealed that the improvements in reading corresponded to increased activity in areas of the brain associated with phonetic processing, being able to associate a symbol with a sound and being able to recognize whether a string of letters represents a word.

glenn

i need a story of great personal struggle, one with no fame or fortune in the end. about life! an hard work an strife, free of glory.the story needs to be true, it needs to be about a woman, an she must have dyslexia! im taking a class in collage and i would like tell her story. my subject is on unsung horoines. try to keep it short if posible? thank you,

glenn

i need a story of great personal struggle, one with no fame or fortune in the end. about life! an hard work an strife, free of glory.the story needs to be true, it needs to be about a woman, an she must have dyslexia! im taking a class in collage and i would like tell her story. my subject is on unsung horoines. try to keep it short if posible? thank you,

Jennifer Martinez

I have a student who has had intensive multisensory instruction to remediate his dyslexia by a very qualified tutor. He is a 5th grader and has intense dysgraphia. Even though work has been done to remediate this, we have not had much improvement. I need some research and instructional strategies to address his severe dysgraphia.

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