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Tuesday, February 23, 2010

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Dr Aust

Perhaps you need a musical category, Liz? I can offer my own homeopathic singalong.

Grant

I've a recent post up about the UK Science and Technology Committee recommendations:

http://sciblogs.co.nz/code-for-life/2010/02/23/homeopathy-check-up-not-in-the-health-system-disclaimers-in-pharmacies/

and an earlier article discussing some aspects of homeopathy and why I believe it shouldn't be in pharmacies:

http://sciblogs.co.nz/code-for-life/2010/01/25/homeopathic-remedies-in-nz-pharmacies/

I was intending to write a series explaining the origins and nonsense associated with homeopathy, but I have to admit with all that's out there, I wonder if it's worth the effort!

Liz Ditz

This is brilliant. Alice in Galaxyland has put up a list of excuses for homeopathy. Some of my favorites:

ARGUMENT FROM NECESSARY OPPOSITES (1)
1) There are problems associated with conventional medicine.
2) Therefore, homeopathy works.

ARGUMENT FROM NECESSARY OPPOSITES (2)
1) Homeopathy doesn't cause side-effects like conventional medicine.
2) Therefore, homeopathy works.

ARGUMENT FROM INCOMPREHENSIBILITY
1) Quantum physics is weird.
2) I don't understand it, and surely you don't either.
3) Therefore, homeopathy works.

Liz Ditz

From Chris McDonald's Business Ethics Blog


Or, since this is The Business Ethics Blog, let's ask it this way: which products is it ethical for a pharmacy to sell? Should pharmacies only sell remedies supported by RCTs? Or is consumer demand the only standard that matters?


Presumably defenders of homeopathy don't think that the government should fund literally every therapy that someone claims is useful. There have to be some standards. Likewise, surely defenders of homeopathy don't think that pharmacies should sell literally every product claimed (by someone) to have some therapeutic value. If I were to think up a "cure for cancer" while in a drunken stupor, surely my new "discovery" shouldn't be sold in pharmacies just because I think it's a cool idea. So, what generalizable principle do fans of homeopathy recommend for sorting this out?


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